Any Way You Look At It

Photo courtesy of Barefoot Blonde.com

Photo courtesy of Barefoot Blonde.com

As I wrapped a few remaining gifts last night and signed a few more cards I came across the Christmas card I purchased for my grandparents. I cried. I hadn’t perceived when I purchased the card just before Thanksgiving that my grandparents would in less than a month become grandparent. I had known the diagnosis, the first, second, and third opinion. I remember when they were first told her cancer was back with a vengeance. Yet and still I couldn’t imagine the reality of Christmas being four days away and her not being here to sing Ave Maria, set up the Christmas village in the bay window in the living room, call me pumpkin as she shows off the new gifts my grandfather purchased for her, or eat breakfast with her and my grandfather over the holiday break at the Springfield Diner.

Tears briskly wiped away I continued wrapping and started to think about the year that has been 2015. If you would have told me a year ago I’d move back across the country, live in a little town that only my grandfather and a gentleman friend ever heard of and take a job that’s thwarted me into the reality of my passion and pursuing it by all means necessary, that my grandmother would be diagnosed with cancer in May and dead in December, I wouldn’t make nearly as much as I thought selling my house, or that my younger brother still wouldn’t be talking to me and the same folks who dismissed his behavior and treatment of me would suddenly grow silent and distant, or that I’d get to speak at the Black Girl Project conference in New York, I would have laughed so hard in your face I would have peed on myself. My current reality is one I was not able to fully perceive in my then current situation. Emphasis on fully perceive.

Photo courtesy of Etsy.com

Photo courtesy of Etsy.com

You see I was capable of perceiving that my reality this year around this time would be better than what it was a year ago. It not being so was simply not an option. The details of that difference I had not dreamed, conceived, truly hoped for-fully perceived. When we perceive a thing, it’s important to take time to conceive that thing, to fully perceive it. If not you end up in different but not necessarily in better.

I wouldn’t allow my mind to continue to do a full year in review. The year is not over which means that I still have time to conceive some of what I perceived as different months ago. I still have time this year to do, get, and be better, not just other than.  You still have time to conceive and create some of those things you perceived would be different for you this year. Maybe there won’t be a house, spouse, child, or promotion. It’s tough when we perceive being and doing well as connected to people or things we cannot control. However, when we envision being and doing well as connected to who we are apart from things and people, we notice that which we can still create in order to make what we envision a reality. There is still time for you to start a workout routine. There is still time for you to learn how to cook (even if it’s an amazing veggie and Swiss omelet). There’s still time for you to draft the business plan, complete the online application for the dream job posting you saw online two weeks ago or for the school you’ve been wanting to go back to. There’s still time to cancel the date with the person you know is no good for you, to stop smoking, to not restock the cabinets with the foods your doctor shared are a part of your high blood pressure issues.  There’s still time for you to forgive yourself, to love yourself, to enjoy yourself.

We are at the start of the very last full week of 2015. You can see this as the end or the beginning. Whichever you perceive it to be may you also conceive it to be an opportunity to be, do, and LIVE well.

Photo courtesy of Pinterest.com

Photo courtesy of Pinterest.com

Love the Work, Loathe the Job

Photo courtesy of Go To Glamour Girl.com

Photo courtesy of Go To Glamour Girl.com

She had hope in her voice when she asked how I liked my job. I was tempted to lie. She knew how challenging things were at the last place. I hated to disappoint her. “It’s ok, ” I responded. I couldn’t lie. She was disappointed. “Just ok?,”  she continued. “Yeah, just okay. I’m grateful for it,”  I said and smiled. She looked confused. “It’s a job Ash. And for that I am grateful but it’s there’s work that I love to do and sometimes that happens at my job, most of the time it doesn’t. That’s okay. I didn’t expect my job to be the place I did my most fulfilling work. But then again I see a job and work as two different things.”  She looked mildly satisfied with my response.

Work and jobs are not one in the same. Work, you will do until you cease to be or cease to be capable. If you are fortunate you may have a job that allows you to do work that you love. If you’re not so fortunate then be grateful for the job, see it for what it is, and make room for the work you want to do that would yield similar benefits to a job (i.e. steady income, ability to cover health insurance, etc.)

The things that matter to us are the things we work with, towards, for, and out. Work is not a desk, a shift of 8, 14, 24, or 36 hours. It is not a destination, doesn’t have a 20 or 60 minute commute. There is no 10 year or 25 year anniversary and no retirement. That’s a job.I think, at least in the U.S. we have made jobs work and this when we leave or finish a job, we think that our work is complete too. Wrong.

Photo courtesy of Exquisite Girl.com

Photo courtesy of Exquisite Girl.com

When I tell people I don’t love my job but I love my work they look puzzled. I smile and wait patiently hoping they get it. Usually they don’t. So I tell them that I love being creative, helping people, having hard but necessary conversations that offer insight, hope, and empowerment. I love creating spaces for people to explore, create, and recreate themselves. I get great joy from providing tools to help people work at relationships. I love allowing people to be courageous in telling their story or changing their story. I even love calling out ignorant and privileged administrators who sprinkle their ill informed ideas with microaggressions and exclusive commentary. However, I ABSOLUTELY DO NOT LOVE  my job.

I do not love the constraints of a schedule, the questioning of my authority or expertise often because of the color of my skin, gender, or age. I do not love meetings or antiquated systems that were never designed to help or support the people I love to partner and work with. I do not love spaces that I can’t feng shui on a whim, or being able to freely choose to work in my home, Starbucks, or the library if that’s what I deem necessary to be productive and effective. I do love not being able to plan travel when I desire because of an event to help staff.  I do enjoy being effective in 4 hours but having to stick around for another four because that’s part of my job. I don’t enjoy being surrounded by a majority of folks who can spell change but have not desire or concept of what that looks like. I loathe being placated and politics that are more times than not self serving and maintain a crabs in the bucket culture. See, ewww , I do not love my job. And I don’t just mean the current one. I haven’t loved a job in a long time. I’ve loved the work, the clients, the students, some of my team, and some of my supervisors. My jobs have been tolerable because I can insert work I love.

When I am not at my job I still work. The creativity, conversations, supporting, space creating, writing, all continue. This blog is work I adore, not a job. Speaking at the Black Girl Project Conference in October, work, not a job. All the conferences and workshops I’ve been privileged to o in the past three years have been wonderful hard yet victorious work.  My relationships, the familial, friend, and other are work. Yes, you have been fooled again if you think relationships aren’t work. They are. May you choose to relate with those who view you as worthy of that work and vice versa.

Photo courtesy of Diego Guevara

Photo courtesy of Diego Guevara

This week may you reconsider your perspective of that which you deem work and that which you see as a job. May you find liberty in knowing your job can be just that, a job, and you can still work at, on, with, for that which you are called and created to do. It’s not an either of, but a both and. May you find new energy and strength for your work (work ain’t always easy) and your job, especially if your job supports you (i.e. helps you keep a roof over your head, food in the fridge, bills paid on time, clothe for the kids, etc.) but doesn’t necessarily make room for you to do work that brings you joy. May you find courage and wisdom to work at the relationships that are hard work and express gratitude for the relationships that aren’t hard work ( I heart the ones where we just get each other, but that’s not to be taken for granted). May you fund time to create a plan that allows you to do more work and less job. And finally, may you you have a great week at your job and a great week working!

Look Up Love!

Photo courtesy of Violet May

Photo courtesy of Violet May

The iconic new York skyline was inching closer as we made our way through the traffic that was slowing that Thursday afternoon due to accident. We waited in awe of the city, it’s whirling traffic and larger than life buildings confidently reflecting the October sky.
Shortly after we checked  into our hotel room we headed out to catch the train uptown for lunch. We got off in Times Square. If you bother to look up in Times Square you notice things you simply wouldn’t otherwise. You catch the well crafted creativity that announces itself unabashedly via architecture, sculptures, billboards, lighting, and occasionally people with sweet smiles looking down from their balconies.
We ate at Obao off of west 46th street and even sitting at the bar, my eyes were drawn up by the light fixtures, high ceilings, and the rolling ladder attached to the end of the bar used to get the top shelf liquor- the good stuff.
It’s kind of funny right. The good liquor is what’s on top, what you have to look up for, what you pay more for. It’s not shelved at eye level. It’s not kept in plain sight.The good stuff is never easily attained or left in plain sight.

Photo courtesy of David LaChapelle

Photo courtesy of David LaChapelle

The rest of the day I found myself looking up more. Sometimes it was necessary, like to see the sign on the corner of Broadway for our hotel. If I didn’t look up I would miss my turn for the side street entrance to my hotel. Sometimes looking up is necessary. Sometimes we will find ourselves in circumstances where we feel boxed in, acutely aware of the barriers to be overcome. The way to overcome them may mean looking up in order to gain perspective.
New York city like many of the cities I love- built up. When horizontal expansion was no longer an option they built up.
What I have learned is that the things we love are rarely the things that were easily attainable. We fall in love with the things that didn’t come so easy. Whether it’s the vintage dress we found after four hours thrift store hopping, the living room that is now our favorite space in the house but took 18 months to curate and decorate to our liking, the relationships we have that well cultivated over moments of misunderstandings, ruined borrowed clothes, waiting over an hour for drinks, awkwardness in how to support us in difficult situations. We love who and what we love because the more we saw, the more we looked up, we saw the beauty, the creativity, and the worthiness of giving our love.
Take a moment to look up. Be surprised, see things differently, notice what has gone unnoticed. Choose to challenge your perspective and don’t be afraid to go for the top shelf good stuff. The good stuff isn’t within everyone’s reach for reason. Look up love! xxoo

Photo courtesy of My Modern Met.com

Photo courtesy of My Modern Met.com

Back at Starbucks

Photo courtesy of Virginia Fasulyan

We were sitting in Starbucks. My dad and I. For those reading this and you know my dad, and Starbucks, go ahead and laugh. I wooed my dad to Starbucks with their lemon cake. If I went to Starbucks, after my writing, reading, and sipping was done, I’d grab a piece of lemon cake for him and he’d swing by my space to visit and indulge in lemony goodness. Our Sundays were busy and I’d soon be heading back to Maryland, so we decided to gather at Starbucks. He got his lemon cake and a mocha. We talked, laughed, and about an hour and a half later we parted ways. Not long after we parted ways he sent me a text thanking me and sharing he enjoyed himself. At 31 years old, it was the first time my dad and I went to Starbucks.

Fifteen years ago I sat in a different Starbucks with my mother. Instead of a tall soy green tea latte, I was sipping a tall vanilla latte. I shared with my mother that once in college I had no intent on maintaining a relationship with my dad. College was my out and I was using it as such. While I am sure many families have their share of dysfunction I was certain my family was one of the few who went back to the buffet of dysfunction for a second serving. I was too young at the time to see that my father was not the sole proprietor of the dysfunction which was why I had no interest in maintaining a relationship with him. Truthfully, I was not interested in maintaining a relationship with dysfunction.

Photo courtesy of Antonio Mora

Photo courtesy of Antonio Mora

Had you told me when I was fifteen that my dad and I would sit at a Starbucks, enjoy each other’s company, tease each other about our beverages of choice, I would not have believed you. I would have respectfully listened, maybe interrupted with slight protest, awkwardly and nervously laughed, and as soon as we parted ways rolled my eyes and called you a liar. Looking back, I just didn’t see that happening. It was not a part of my plan to work on myself and my relationship with my dad. How could it have been at 16?

At age 17 I decided to do some work, primarily at the encouragement of my mother. I started counseling the spring semester of my first year of college and stuck with it until my senior year spring semester. I only stopped seeing my counselor because I was at a different campus that semester.

At age 21, a few months after I  graduated undergrad, started my first full time job at a non profit in downtown Philadelphia, my mother decided to leave my father after 22 years of marriage.  At age 21, I decided that I was going to work on myself and my relationship with my dad. I decided to find a counselor, use my hard earned non profit not quite $30000.00 a year money to pay out of pocket, and go to counseling.  At age 31, that decision was one of the absolute best decisions I have made.

Photo courtesy of Lucia O'Connor McCarthy

Photo courtesy of Lucia O’Connor McCarthy

Looking back, choosing to go to counseling taught me:

  1. I can ask for help and receive help.
  2. Asking for help is not a demonstration of weakness or incompetency.
  3. I am responsible for me.
  4. It’s okay to say no. People may not like it and that is for them to manage, not me.
  5. I am not my parents and I am not destined to their successes or failures.
  6. I am not my past; yet I can use it as a powerful tool to craft my future.
  7. Boundaries keep what needs to be in my life in and what needs to stay out of my life out.
  8. I’m not crazy and when I am in relationships or environments that constantly make me feel crazy it is appropriate for me to assess and exit as needed.
  9. Commitment is a choice and not a trap.
  10. It’s okay to not be in relationship with people who don’t know how to value me.
  11. It’s okay to disagree and to communicate that I disagree.
  12. I get to choose who is worthy of me sharing myself and my life with.

There are lots of other things I have learned from being in counseling over the years. Yet I find that these handful of takeaways are ones I refer back to from time to time. These are the ones weren’t a part of my upbringing, yet weren’t too late to learn and implement for a more grounded and joyful present,and certainly a more positive and hopeful future. These are the ones that I regularly remind clients, students, family members, ad friends of as they navigate their own life journeys.

We’ve spent the past couple of weeks talking about the power of looking back and even going back from time to time. It’s easy to let the past lay alone as a memory mentally shelved in a closet labeled “do not open.” It’s easy to not go back, or to decide that going back somehow either reflects poorly on us or is a badge of honor if going back proves difficult. If we can go back to that which was painful or hard then back can be a good thing. Poppycock.

Photo courtesy of Lala sparkles Tumblr.com

Photo courtesy of Lala sparkles Tumblr.com

The reality is that as long as we know when and how to let go of whatever happened in the “back,”we are fine. It’s when we don’t that we impede our present and either stumble towards or never get to our futures. When we allow going back to become mountains in the valleys of our lives, we risk never getting to our promised land. When we can look back or go back and see what we need to glean, gather it, and carry on, then that indeed is just another way we can be, do, and LIVE well.

Mind The Gap & Take The Leap

As the train lurched into the station to a slow screeching stop an announcement was made “Please watch the gap as you are exiting the train.”  I was curious as to how big this gap was, especially as it was announcement worthy. Nonetheless as I made my exit, oversized tote bag in hand, I was mindful of the gap. As I walked toward the stairs I glanced back at the train and the gap between it and the platform. It wasn’t a huge gap, but it was there, and I knew that if I or any other passengers weren’t paying much attention we could get hurt.

Looking forward it’s often easy to see things so that we can know how to plan and navigate accordingly. We step left to miss the puddle. We swerve right to avoid the pot hole. We purchase the extra bottle of wine in case someone shows but forgot to RSVP. We remember the meeting may be in a frigid space and we grab the cardigan before heading out. We listen to the announcement and we mind the gap, stepping over it carefully.

Photo courtesy of Yellow Trace Tumblr.com

Looking back, there is no planning or navigating. The event has happened. We stepped in the dog mess so now we are cleaning of four shoes. We hit the pot hole and Uncle Ralph can squeeze us in at 5:30 this evening to fix the axel. We didn’t get to the store for the wine because we were already running late to our own party and four people who didn’t RSVP did show up. We forgot the sweater and by the time it was our turn to give the report we were shivering and our nipples were embarrassingly showing through the blush colored silk blouse we wore. We look back at the gap, and we are thankful for the announcement.

A few weeks ago one of the speakers at The Yellow Conference shared that as she looked back at her time abroad and the things that moved her, looked at her present employment situation which she knew was pretty fantastic, and looked forward to what she wanted for her life, there was a gap. There was a gap between her past experience abroad working to empower women in a country where they were anything but, and her present. She was presently employed with a great company, working in the field she had studied in undergraduate school. There was also a gap between her present and her future. In her future she saw herself empowering women and doing so closely related to how she had been able to do so when she was abroad.  She decided to mind the gap. She decided to be mindful about the gap. With the gap on her mind, she closed it by quitting her job and going back to empower those women to create items she would sell in the US and these women would have income and be able to complete their education.

Photo courtesy of Getty Images

Photo courtesy of Getty Images

Before I got off the train and before the announcement was ever made I was reading a magazine. The article was about what some article at some point in just about every women’s magazine is about at some point in the year- having it all. As an aside, I personally don’t want it all, and other than balancing checkbooks, I’m not pro life balance as much as integration. I’m pro being one whole person, not two selves that need constant balance. I digress. The article reminded me of the gap between the few things I wanted for myself and paralleled them against my realty.  But I didn’t get stuck in the gap. I didn’t fall in. I spent the remaining twenty minutes thinking of ways to close the gap and being mindful of my current reality. I was choosing to mind the gap in my life. 

I don’t want to look back at the gaps in my life and see that they have become vast canyons that I could slip into at any moment. I don’t want to waste my life digging myself out of gaps I knew existed but never paid attention to. I don’t want to be so close to the platform of what’s next for me, but allowing my foot to get stuck between the experiences that brought me to the moment and my entry into the opportunity.

Photo courtesy B Smart Guide.com

Photo courtesy B Smart Guide.com

Mondays are great days to mind the gap for your entire week. How much of your week will get planned around anything and everything but what you need and want for yourself?  How many days will you choose not to update your resume and apply for a new job, talk to your adviser and switch majors, decide that your child does not need to be in ballet, soccer, and karate and by scaling back one activity you get more time to I don’t know finish writing that cook book you started eight years and two children ago?

I don’t want Friday to come this week and you look back and the gap has become a chasm. May you mind the gap this Monday. xxoo

Lessons Learned In Rewind

Some days I have the fortune of engaging with a really great customer service representative. Sunday I had such fortune with one of the customer service representatives at Go Daddy. As she assisted me with some of my technical difficulties we chatted abut what led me to start The Simply LIVEd Life, how the weather is in my part of the country, and before you knew it she was asking about my time out west and what I learned. These were some of the things I shared with her when I look back at my time out west. Happy hump day! xxoo 

There is no redemption without death. Some (3)

DAY SPA

The ocean stirsthe heart, inspiresthe imagination&

Back After Baby- One Woman’s Story

We are just about half way through September, the unofficial end to summer has come and gone, leaves are starting to change color (at least in my nook of the world), and fall is about to make a comeback. Folks are settling into familiar routines once again and the new normal, you know the one, the September through May routine, is back in action. Yet while you read this and nod in agreement, there are men and women who have a new September through May routine, one that is shaped by the birth of a child.

Recently I caught up with Ronika Money- Adams, wife of one, mom of two, lover of Jesus, dweller of Dover, Delaware, higher education professional, believer in educating, supporting, and empowering women, and sharer of her experiences in going back to work after the birth of her two children, Kimora and Kaiden. May her words resonate and encourage you. 

Photo courtesy of Alex Elle

Photo courtesy of Alex Elle

TSLL: As a mother of two children, it would seem that you have had to “go back to work” twice. What if anything was different about going back to work after Kimora’s birth? After Kaiden’s?

RMA: After Kimora’s birth, I did not return to work until she was 7½ months old.  I had resigned from my position as a Residence Director and was looking for a new opportunity. That opportunity ended up being a full time position with a 3-4 day schedule at a non profit organization. Due to the schedule, I didn’t feel as if I had fully returned back to work until I was hired full time at a university in Pennsylvania, when she was approaching 11 months old. I would say had a somewhat smooth adjustment with her.

Now, returning to work after Kaiden’s birth was painful to be honest.  Unlike Kimora, Kaiden had an emergency delivery and spent nearly 3 weeks in the neonatal intensive care unit.  I returned to work just after he turned 3 months old.  I found myself regretting my decision to return so soon.  I would’ve preferred to have returned when he was at least 5 or 6 months old, but with our medical bills rolling in so quickly I didn’t want us to be down one salary. I did not feel the same peace I felt when I returned to work after having Kaiden. I wanted the have the same foundation of time I had with Kimora.  I also breastfed Kaiden which added another layer of difference to my return to work.

TSLL: What would you do differently if anything about maternal/paternal leave?

RMA: I would have researched the options for a reduced work schedule to ease my transition back to work with Kaiden or have made budgetary adjustments to allow for a longer leave period.

TSLL: When you think about the first time you went back to work after your first child, what was the most exciting?  Most challenging?

RMA: The most exciting thing was being able to communicate with adults about adult issues.  When I was home with Kimora, I gained a new found respect for stay at home moms.  They do not have an easy job. The most challenging thing was not being able to spend time with Kimora the way I had when I was home. We played together, took naps together, and I found her smile to be soothing. Thankfully, she was being watched by my mom who was 5 minutes away from the job I had when she was 7 ½ months and 30 minutes away from the position I took in Pennsylvania.

TSLL: What do wish you had known about the back to work transition?

RMA: I wish that I had known that I could have worked an abbreviated schedule to assist with my transition back to work. I also wished that I had paid more attention to the attitude and culture of my workplace towards returning mothers.  There are no nursing spaces and accommodations are different for staff and faculty who are returning parents.

TSLL: How does being a working mom influence the way you parent, if at all?
RMA: Being a working mom, influences the level of importance I place on spending time with my children. Work has my time 40 hours or more a week.  I want to make sure my children have time with me as well.  I don’t want them to say at my funeral “ We loved our mom, she was always at work.”  I find this to be the case more now that I am a mother of two and my daughter will be 8 years old. She needs me to be there. I’m working on taking more time off.

TSLL: How does parenting influence the way you work, if at all?
RMA: I believe being a parent has made me for empathetic and understanding of out of work life issues affecting my staff.   If someone is sick, I want them to stay home and get well. I know what it feels like to run yourself into to the ground at work and come home to do same thing.  I’ve become a better supervisor in my opinion as a result of my having a second child and trying to take better care of myself for them.

TSLL: How did your friends and family have supported you in the back to work transition?

RMA: I’m very blessed.  My mother  has been the caretaker for both of my children when I returned to work after their births.  She is honored to take care of her grandchildren and finds it rewarding to spend time with them.  I don’t know that my transitions would have been as smooth as they were emotionally if she wasn’t so supportive.  My aunt was also a great source of support in the area of child care with Kimora whenever my mother wasn’t available.

TSLL: How could employers  have supported you in the back to work transition?

RMA: Employers can be more understanding of the lack of sleep and emotional strain being experienced by returning parents. I can’t say that these two issues are limited to mothers because there are fathers who take paternity leave and experience just as much of a lack of sleep and emotional strain.

TSLL: Looking back, at your experience of going back, are there any words of wisdom you would offer parents returning to work after having, adopting, or being given custody of a child?

RMA: My advice to any parents returning to work would be to establish a transition plan that gives you and your family the most peace.  I know finances play a huge role in when we choose to return but it is vital that you have a sense of peace for you and your family.  Research your Human Resource policies related to leave and utilize a flexible schedule option.

So what was your transition like back to work? #DaretoShare

Back It up With Words

As I have talked to friends and family about what going back to school has looked like in their homes this past week the stories and pictures have poured in. Me being a bit of a nostalgic, I couldn’t help but think of some of my back to school moments. The one tradition that was my favorite that lasted all the way through high school was my grandfather calling on the first day of school to give us a pep talk. So today I am just sharing a few of the send offs my family would give me when I was heading back to school. Happy hump day! xxoo

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Me Myself and The Lessons

Wednesday I shared I was beyond excited to attend The Yellow Conference. This morning I want to share that my excitement was worth it. It was an amazing time. I am still high fiving myself for attending. And, I really want to share some of the things that were great reminders and really resonated with me in hopes that they may do the same for you. I also really really really want to take this last day of the month to remind you to take care of yourself. You only get one you and you are worthy of the healthiest version of yourself that you can offer. You are worthy of your best energy, creativity, ideas, care, and love. Which is why I want to wrap this month by sending one of you some love from The Love Letter Library. Nicole Ahr, the founder of The Love Letter Library has a sweet collection of stationary, journals, pens, and totes, and they are all in the name of love. She has an even sweeter story about how she started her business about live, and it started by her leaving love letters for people reminding them of how loved and worthy of love they are.  So if you would like to receive a free “Love Is My Jam”  bundle from Nicole,  keep up the love for The Simply LIVED Life by not only reading the blog but joining the community by liking our Facebook page by clicking here or following @AhyanaJenise on Twitter. If you like or follow before noon EST Wednesday September 2nd, 2015 then you will have entered to win the bundle. Winner will be announced Friday at noon EST on Twitter and Facebook.

perfect is the enemy of good (4)

Words by Jocelyn Hefner

perfect is the enemy of good (6)

Words by Vik Harrison

perfect is the enemy of good (7)

Words by Jeff Shinbarger

perfect is the enemy of good

Words by Liz Forkin Bohannon

perfect is the enemy of good (1)

Wise Words This Wednesday

Hellooooo!! These words are sent to you on the eve of one of my better decisions to take care of myself. I am beyond excited to participate in The Yellow Conference- A conference for creative women who want to change the world. I’m also super excited to do it in a city (small towns like my new one has a purpose but I am a city girl). I promise I woke up smiling and had to hold myself back from dancing as opposed to walking to the office this morning. There will be some amazing women speaking their truths and wise words and today I want to leave you with a few wise words on making sure out keep getting comfortable with making you, your needs, dreams, goals, and purpose more of a priority. Don’t go full self centered narcissist on me, but don’t neglect your amazing self! xxoo

Photo courtesy of Pressed Juicery.com

Photo courtesy of Pressed Juicery.com

Photo courtesy of Ambitious Kitchen.com

Photo courtesy of Ambitious Kitchen.com

Photo courtesy of Positive Life Tips.com

Photo courtesy of Positive Life Tips.com

Photo courtesy of Kush and Wizdom

Photo courtesy of Kush and Wizdom

Photo courtesy of Sye of Relief

Photo courtesy of Sye of Relief

Photo courtesy of Buzzfeed.com

Photo courtesy of Buzzfeed.com

Photo courtesy of Fit Woman.com

Photo courtesy of Fit Woman.com